Khloë: 8 months old (37 weeks)

Here we go:


37 weeks (August 19)

37 weeks (August 19)


At the beginning of the week CCAC sent an Occupational Therapist and Physiotherapist to our home to meet with Khloë. The ladies were very friendly and Khloë gave them lots of smiles. I showed the OT the feeding chair and the infant rocker chair we currently use and explained that, although they work fine right now, Baby Girl is growing quickly and will soon be too tall for these chairs. Since she can’t support her head when upright, Khloë needs to be partially reclined when sitting in either of her chairs. These chairs are meant for babies who develop into strong toddlers who can hold their heads up and don’t need extra support. The OT said she would look into finding us a tumble form chair.


Beauty

On Wednesday we went to Prenatal Nutrition. In the late afternoon, Mary from Infant Development came and worked with Khloë for an hour. We agreed that she would benefit from infant massage and we will start that in September.

The most important part of the week was Khloë’s appointment at CHEO on Friday. We met with an anesthesiologist to discuss Baby Girl’s upcoming G-tube (gastrostomy) surgery. It looks like surgery will take place next Wednesday, August 27th, but we must wait for confirmation. In our original discussion with the surgeon, we were told to expect three days in the hospital for recovery and training on how to use the feeding pump. I voiced my concerns to the anesthesiologist about fasting, as it’s not good for an SMA child to go more than 6 hours without adequate nutrition–Khloë will need to fast starting four hours prior to surgery. Other SMA families advised us to have PPN (peripheral parenteral nutrition) given to Khloë, but even though I asked for it and the doctor said she would make a note about it on Khloë’s chart, I doubt she will get it. We were told that it’s not protocol at CHEO to do PPN.

The following quote, taken from the “Consensus Statement for Standard of Care in Spinal Muscular Atrophy”, is on the dangers of fasting:

Spinal Muscular Atrophy patients are particularly vulnerable to catabolic and fasting states [and] are more likely to develop hypoglycemia in the setting of fasting… Thus, it is necessary to avoid prolonged fasting, particularly in the setting of acute illness, in all Spinal Muscular Atrophy patients. Nutritional intake should be optimized to meet full caloric needs within 4 to 6 hours after an admission for acute illness, via enteral feeding, parenteral feeding, or a combined approach as necessary. Prompt postoperative caloric supplementation is recommended to avoid muscle catabolism, particularly in a child with reduced fat store.

As long as the surgery goes well, she’ll be given Pedialyte; if she tolerates that and has been extubated with no breathing issues, I’ll be able to breastfeed. If Khloë is too tired to nurse, I can give her pumped milk with a syringe. I have no idea how long she will end up going without eating if she isn’t given PPN and can’t breastfeed right away.


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Catch that tongue

On a happier note, my sweetpea has added the sounds “guh guh” and “ba ba ba” to her repertoire of baby babble. She’s being saying “mum mum mum” for awhile now but usually while upset. She even mouths it without the sound coming out, which is really cute. She also tries to copy me when I make a certain noise with my tongue. It’s hard to describe but she’s fascinated by watching me do it!

Khloë: 5 months old (23 weeks)

The latest photo:


23 weeks (May 13)

23 weeks (May 13)


Mary from Infant & Child Development came to assess Khloë on Wednesday. She was very nice and explained her concerns. She pointed out a few things that Khloë does with her hands and feet that I hadn’t noticed before; I wouldn’t have known it wasn’t normal, as she’s my first baby. Mary said the problem looks like low muscle tone, which would explain why Khloë still has trouble holding up her head and doesn’t use her legs much. She agreed it would benefit Baby Girl to come into the program, so starting in June she will see Khloë every week to work with her. She also wants to teach me infant massage!


All smiles!

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Then on Thursday we drove to Ottawa and met with pediatrician Dr I at a medical centre. She looked Khloë over and said she was very concerned about her gross motor development. She is going to get Khloë an appointment with a neurologist at CHEO for an MRI. I really don’t know what to expect for her development or what the issue could be. She’s such a happy baby and has no idea that she’s behind for her age.

I’m glad we have the resources here to provide support for my girl.